OMG GMO! Part 2: Are GMOs bad?

OMG GMO! Part 2: Are GMOs bad?

The second post in our series wades into the good and bad of GMOs. There are a lot of articles out there that make the claim that there’s no such thing as a good GMO and that all of them are bad in some way. Others would have you believe that they are all completely harmless. We take a look at some of the different modifications out there to help you decide whether modifying crops is good or bad.

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Charles Darwin, Lewis Carroll, and Daphnia magna

Charles Darwin, Lewis Carroll, and Daphnia magna

"Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place."

Organisms must continue to adapt, lest they be overcome by predators or left behind by prey, but all of that adapting leaves them with no more advantage than they had before. This idea has come to be called the Red Queen Hypothesis, and it made quite an impact on the field of evolutionary biology.

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Changing the World by Accident

Changing the World by Accident

“Most important discoveries or creations are accidental…” I’ve come across this phrase or something similar many times. A quick Google search reveals that it is even showing up on standardized tests in writing prompts given to school kids. Not only is the statement just plain wrong, but it gives a terrible impression of what scientists do.

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What was King Philip really up to?

What was King Philip really up to?

King Philip came over for good spaghetti. I've heard the story many times since I was in high school, though the object of his majesty’s desire is not always the same. Most versions claim that he was looking for some sort of food:good spaghetti, garden salads, Genoa salami.  Other more salacious tales allege that his royal highness came over for good sex. It turns out that this is a very simplified version of a much more complex tale.

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What can we learn from mutants?

What can we learn from mutants?

Don't go conjuring up images of giant, city devouring monsters, or crime fighting turtles; those aren't the kinds of mutants we learn from. I'm talking about mutations that arise during the development of an organism and how scientists are able to use them in order to learn about the process of embryonic development. We all know that a sperm fertilizes an egg, and an embryo develops, eventually giving rise to a new organism. What you may not realize is that there are a lot of different ways to get from the first cell to a juvenile organism. In the course of my research, I've come across two interesting developmental abnormalities that serve to illustrate two of the major modes of development. 

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