Molecule of the Month: The Most Dangerous Game.

Molecule of the Month: The Most Dangerous Game.

What better way to start off the year than with a Molecules of the Month theme of poison/venom. In this article, I break down [literally] the distinction between poison and venom, down to the chemical components. 
What does it take for an organism to be poisonous/venomous? Why are some organisms more deadly than others?

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OMG GMO! Part 2: Are GMOs bad?

OMG GMO! Part 2: Are GMOs bad?

The second post in our series wades into the good and bad of GMOs. There are a lot of articles out there that make the claim that there’s no such thing as a good GMO and that all of them are bad in some way. Others would have you believe that they are all completely harmless. We take a look at some of the different modifications out there to help you decide whether modifying crops is good or bad.

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Science and Socioeconomics: Humans to Hyenas

Science and Socioeconomics: Humans to Hyenas

We recognize that making the choice to smoke a cigarette can damage your lungs and too much  alcohol can damage your liver, but what if something as passive as your social status could affect the most fundamental building blocks of your biology? 

Find out how social and economic ranking affects the very building blocks of our being and how this biology connects us to hyenas. It's not all a laughing matter...

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Molecule of the Month: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD)

Molecule of the Month: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD)

Lysergic Acid Diethylamide, a molecule commonly referred to as LSD, has been known for its recreational "benefits". Musicians write songs about it, artists draw inspiration from it, Disney makes films about it, intellectuals state they have had breakthroughs with its use, and druggies rave about it.  Is LSD really what people claim it to be or is it all just hype? 

This article delves into the facts and fiction behind this popular molecule with an aim to find out.

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Three billion puzzle pieces: insights into the Human Genome Project

Three billion puzzle pieces: insights into the Human Genome Project

After 16 years and nearly $3 billion, the Human Genome Project was officially completed in 2004. This challenging task of sequencing and assembling a human genome was achieved through the collaboration of 20 international institutions and more than 200 scientists. However, today a single laboratory can sequence a human genome in only a few months at a fraction of the cost. This is made possible by next-generation sequencing technologies, and among these, Illumina is king!

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Molecule of the Month: Something Sweet.

Molecule of the Month: Something Sweet.

How can salt and sugar look identical, but taste entirely different?  What makes sugar taste sweet and why is that a taste we crave?  Check out this month's post on molecules, going into the nitty gritty of these questions, to find out!

Photo credit: simplenutritiontips.com

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