We are a collection of researchers working in a wide variety of fields including microbiology, ecology, agriculture, dairy science, marine biology, and the philosophy of science.  

What do we have in common? A desire to bring science in easily digestible and understandable pieces for those who are interested. 

Stay hungry!

 

Mutualism of the Month: Solar-powered sea slugs and their photosyntheic algae

Mutualism of the Month: Solar-powered sea slugs and their photosyntheic algae

Solar-powered sea slugs! With live algae in their guts, they can harness the power of the sun; some don't need to feed for nine months. What makes this particular sea slug so special is how it obtains its algae. Check out the full post to find out how!

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How Fungi Saved the World

How Fungi Saved the World

A long time ago, back before the dinosaurs were even a twinkle in a primitive reptile's eye and before that reptile's ancestor was even a twinkle in a primitive amphibian's eye, before plants thought seeds were a neat idea and invertebrates were disquietingly large, terrestrial life found itself with a bit of a problem. We're in the Carboniferous period, and the world's biggest coal deposits are being laid down in the first forests. The atmosphere is much different than in modern times: carbon dioxide concentrations are approaching disastrously low levels, and oxygen is soaring. The foot-long dragonflies that flit through this dense, breathable atmosphere are having a good time, but we're on the brink of a major ice age caused by global cooling.

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The Ocean 180 Video Challenge- Telling the Human Story of Science

The Ocean 180 Video Challenge- Telling the Human Story of Science

“If science is about anything, it is about scientists. It is a profoundly human story. It is your story. If we remember that, we can all help the public gain a deeper, richer understanding of science.” Prajwal Kulkarni

Mallory Watson, a scientist with the Florida Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE Florida), is our latest guest talking about the very human story behind science and Ocean 180’s mission to tell that story through video.

Think you’re up to the Challenge? Visit ocean180.org for information on how to get involved, or contact info@ocean180.org with questions.

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How can we "see" the seafloor beneath the ocean waves?

How can we "see" the seafloor beneath the ocean waves?

Marine natural resources professionals are often tasked with managing a part of the world that we know so little about that we don't even have good maps of it - for example, can we put a wind farm at a specific location or is there important fish habitat located there? Find out how scientists are using state-of-the-art sonar technologies to map the ocean floor and the important habitats located there.

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Bryozoans and The Borg: Life in the collective

Bryozoans and The Borg: Life in the collective

What if I told you that there are creatures living on our planet that have striking similarities to a fearsome alien race in Star Trek?  Im talking about colonial organisms.  As it turns out, there are many groups of animals who have some members living a colonial lifestyle, including insects, mammals, shrimp, seabirds, and some marine invertebrates you may not have heard of before! 

What makes life in a colony so compelling?  Read on, to learn more!

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Running On the Brain

Running On the Brain

Bikini season is here and so the jogging begins! Did you know that running can not only help you fit into that two-piece, but also prime your brain to better complete daily tasks? Aerobic exercise has even shown to help prevent the tragic neurological symptoms of mental diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease!

Start by getting your mind active here... 

(Image from: Dr. Jack Lewis - Sort Your Brain Out)

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Can I eat this? What makes something edible

Can I eat this? What makes something edible

This year I learned that I could be part of the foraging wildlife. 

Throughout Buffalo berries on Amelachier bushes are ripening to a deep red. As I walk through the city and pass a bush, I take a few berries and contemplate the idea of edibility. How can I eat an Amelachier berry, but not the leaves? Why can we eat lettuce leaves, but not grass or maple leaves? 

What makes something edible? 

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Mutualism of the Month: Lac-insects and their bodyguards

Mutualism of the Month: Lac-insects and their bodyguards

Shellac is unrivaled when it comes to getting a high-gloss finish for your furniture and wooden instruments. The same product is used to coat your fruits and vegetables, candies, snacks, and pastries to make them look fresher and more appealing. This special compound is produced by refining the excretions of the lac-insect. While the lac-insect is busy excreting lac, it needs a bodyguard - this is where the mutualism comes in. Click through to read more!

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